The bible and radiocarbon dating archaeology

Chances are, right now, you have a Gregorian calendar stuck to your wall.This calendar, with the months January through December, is a business standard used in many places round the world to define the year: one which hearkens back to Christian and Roman Imperial precedents.Living organisms absorb a proportional amount of radioactive carbon fourteen isotopes to what is constantly present in the earth’s atmosphere.When that organism dies, the carbon fourteen decays at a known exponential rate: making it possible to calculate the approximate time when the organism died based on how much carbon fourteen remains in a sample of the dead material.At the beginning of the process, it is important to remember that only certain materials can be tested using carbon dating, i.e. Sites like Stonehenge, Chichén Itzá, and Rapa Nui, where the focus is on large stone monuments, cannot be dated unless corroborating evidence can be found to assign a possible date.Such was the case at these three sites, where wooden and pollen elements could be dated, providing a speculative chronology for the sites as a whole, but even these are subject to error and constant scrutiny by the academic community.

And also, rather importantly, the laws of radioactive decay hypothesize that once a living organism is dead, it no longer interacts with anything in its environment which would affect the speed of its radioactive decay.It can date a variety of materials, ranging from, but not necessarily limited to: bone, shell, charcoal, soft tissue, horn, teeth, ivory, hair, blood, wool, silk, leather, paper, parchment, insects, coral, metal if there is charcoal present in it, and sometimes dirt.Carbon dating assumes a variety of things about the natural world in order to work. Different cultures around the world record time in different fashions.According to the Gregorian calendar, it is the year 2009 AD. The Kaliyuga Hindu Calendar maintains it is 5110, the Islamic calendar 1430 and the Persian, 2630.

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But radiocarbon dating tries its best; and can often serve as a base for additional scientific techniques which can clarify results further.

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